Acupuncture

Overview

Many people connect the concept of acupuncture with needling insertion. Acupuncture is a very wide concept. In USA, it includes all kinds of techniques related to acupuncture and moxibustion (針灸,Zhen Jiu), such as regular filiform needle therapy, electro-acupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, cupping, skin needle therapy, intradermal needle therapy, three-edged needle therapy, indirect moxibustion therapy, direct moxibustion therapy, point external application therapy, acupressure, guasha, etc. Different acupuncture prescription with different manipulation, work differently.
How to choose acupuncture points and techniques, how to apply different manipulations, depends on the doctor’s medical knowledge and clinical experiences, so to find a well-educated, experienced provider is very important.
Acupuncture involves the insertion of very thin needles (up to 20) through your skin at strategic points on your body. A key component of traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture is most used to treat pain. Increasingly, it is being used for overall wellness, including stress management.
Traditional Chinese medicine explains acupuncture as a technique for balancing the flow of energy or life force — known as chi or qi (chee) — believed to flow through pathways (meridians) in your body. By inserting needles into specific points along these meridians, acupuncture practitioners believe that your energy flow will re-balance.
In contrast, many Western practitioners view the acupuncture points as places to stimulate nerves, muscles and connective tissue. Some believe that this stimulation boosts your body's natural painkillers.

Why it's done

Acupuncture is used mainly to relieve discomfort associated with a variety of diseases and conditions, including:

Risks

The risks of acupuncture are low if you have a competent, certified acupuncture practitioner using sterile needles. Common side effects include soreness and minor bleeding or bruising where the needles were inserted. Single-use, disposable needles are now the practice standard, so the risk of infection is minimal. Not everyone is a good candidate for acupuncture. You may be at risk of complications if you:

How you prepare

No special preparation is required before acupuncture treatment.

Choosing a practitioner

If you're considering acupuncture, take the same steps you would to choose a doctor:
Tell your doctor you're considering acupuncture. He or she may be able to tell you about the success rate of using acupuncture for your condition or recommend an acupuncture practitioner.

What you can expect

Acupuncture treatment

During an acupuncture treatment, your acupuncturist inserts very thin needles into specific spots on your body. Insertion of the needles usually causes little discomfort.
Each person who performs acupuncture has a unique style, often blending aspects of Eastern and Western approaches to medicine. To determine the type of acupuncture treatment that will help you the most, your practitioner may ask you about your symptoms, behaviors and lifestyle. He or she may also closely examine:
This initial evaluation and treatment may take up to 60 minutes. Subsequent appointments usually take about a half-hour. A common treatment plan for a single complaint would typically involve one or two treatments a week. The number of treatments will depend on the condition being treated and its severity. In general, it's common to receive six to eight treatments.

During the procedure

After the procedure

Some people feel relaxed and others feel energized after an acupuncture treatment. But not everyone responds to acupuncture. If your symptoms don't begin to improve within a few weeks, acupuncture may not be right for you.

Next steps

If you need further information and obtain a second opinion please download the app "Obur Health PA" from the App Store or call 832-730-4479
download on the app store or call 832-730-4479

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